"The Reformation and the City" — Department of Theological Studies of Concordia University and McGill’s School of Religious Studies

"The Reformation and the City"
Department of Theological Studies of Concordia University and McGill’s School of Religious Studies

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Five hundred years ago, on October 31, 1517, Martin Luther reportedly posted his 95 theses on the door of the Castle Church of Wittenberg. His hammer helped spark a fire, out of the ashes of which arose the modern world. The Reformation, as the movement came to be known, gave birth to political, cultural, and economic movements, ushering in a new age. Luther himself became a figure both loved and reviled. To mark the 500th anniversary of the Protestant Reformation, and Montreal’s 375th anniversary, the Department of Theological Studies of Concordia University and McGill’s School of Religious Studies are holding a two-day conference on The Reformation and the City. Keynote speakers include Kirsi Stjerna (general editor of the new Luther translation ‘The Annotated Luther’), Brooks Schramm (co-author of Martin Luther, the Bible, and the Jewish People), and, among others, Catherine Clifford, Jarrett Carty, Jason Zuidema, and Allen Jorgenson. The conference is convened by Matthew R. Anderson, Dept. of Theological Studies, Concordia, together with Gerbern Oegema, School of Religious Studies, McGill. It will be hosted Monday and Tuesday May 8-9, 2017 by Concordia’s Dept. of Theological Studies and McGill’s School of Religious Studies, both in the heart of downtown Montreal.

We invite scholars and graduate students to submit an abstract of 250 words that interacts in any way with the theme of the conference "Reformation and the City." In view of the TRC recommendations, perspectives from indigenous scholars would be particularly welcome. Please send abstracts in the body of an email to: reformationandthecity@gmail.com along with institutional affiliation and position (if applicable). Deadline for the call for papers is January 31, 2017has been extended to February 28, 2017. Papers welcome in French and English.